Secure Our Students

The late 1990s and early 2000s saw a shocking rise in school violence. Some parental and educational groups attributed this rise in violence to the violence depicted in video games. These type of statements had parental groups and gaming companies at each other’s throats. Fortunately, for everyone involved, a new study released would suggest that school violence is dropping rapidly. Top notch security teams and security measures have been implemented in the majority of American schools. This isn’t to say that school violence is everywhere, but it does go to show that parenting groups and children’s advocates would rather be safe than sorry.

In 2009, 74 percent of schools were recorded to have been involved in violent incidents. Qnet data shows these incidents dropped 9 percent this year alone and the numbers keep getting lower. Studies show that 94 percent of the incidents include bullying of some form, which would suggest that physical violence is at a record low of 6 percent or less. School administration has implemented more measures to make sure these numbers steadily decline. These methods include: advance security cameras, well trained security personnel, local police, identification systems for students and teachers, and regular programs to keep students up to date with quality safety procedures. Many of these methods are being implemented in high schools before middle schools or elementary schools. Studies showed that 90 percent of the nation’s high schools reported acts or threats of violence. Middle schools and elementary schools only reported that 53 percent of their schools was responsible for the same actions. Local PTA’s and school boards are happy about these numbers but want to strive to eliminate school violence completely.

Empathetic Rats

People often think of rats as dirty pests that they want exterminated. A new study has revealed that they are even more intelligent and caring then previously thought. A test was done with several rats. One rat was put in a transparent glass section next to another rat who was stuck in water. The dry rat could open a door when it saw the other rat was in distress. Almost every time, the rat was willing to help the others. They switched the scenarios for the rats where the one in water in the dry section, and the one in the dry section was moved to the water. Once a rat had been in the water, he remembered how it felt and hurried to help the rat in distress much faster than a rat who hadn’t been in the water. Folks at STX Entertainment agree that the studies prove their empathy for one another and emotional intelligence.